Friday, February 22, 2008

ASK SENSEI

Click on "Comments" at the bottom of this post to ask Sensei any questions about karate or kobudo kata, ju jitsu curriculum, or anything at all about your training or your child's training, rank requirements, etc. This blog post will act as an informal forum in which all of your martial arts-related questions will be answered. Please also feel free to share any comments or feedback about anything relating to the dojo; classes, special events, etc. If you have a question, it's likely others are looking for an answer as well, so don't be shy!

85 comments:

Mike said...

Hey Sensei Noah, what is the difference between Pinan and Heian Kata? Look forward to your response. Thanks, Sempai Mike

Sensei Noah said...

Pinan and Heian are the exact same thing. Itosu-sensei created the Pinan forms as simplified reworkings of the Chiang Nan kata (a complex Chinese series of forms that is commonly practiced today in various Chinese arts such as kenpo) - Itosu-sensei called these kata "Pinan," which is loosely translated as "peaceful mind." When karate was taken to Japan, the Japanese pronounced this word "Heian," although the kata are the same. They aren't different kata, just different ways to pronounce the same word - the Okinawan "Pinan" vs. the Japanese "Heian." Currently, most Okinawan & Japanese styles include some variation of the Pinan kata in their curriculum (Goju-ryu being a notable exception). In general, styles with an Okinawan lineage (such as ours) use the "Pinan" pronunciation, whereas systems with Japanese lineage tend to use the "Heian" pronunciation.

cjpace said...

I think I searched the whole web site and I could not find the samurai meditation. Could it be posted on here?
If you do not get to add it in the next day or so, hopefully I will remember (when I am home again) to add it in from the terminology sheet.
Sorry, I am just trying to put this in as many places as possible, so that I can study it anywhere.
Thanks,
Sempai Chris

Mike said...

Hey Sensei Noah, I liked that post on the web site. Very cool. Another question for you. When a Kata is called for example Pinan Sandan, the Karate-ka responds by repeating the Kata name. Question is with Tensho, Saifa and Shinto. Why do we sometimes say Tensho No Kata or Shinto No Kata or Saifa No Kata?

Thanks, Sempai Mike

Sensei Noah said...

Semapi Chris,

Hmmmm. . .the meditation should be up on the site under TERMINOLOGY. I'll look into it. Meanwhile, here it is (written in Romaji phoenetics):

Ken to wa kokoro nari
Kokoro tadashi kariba sono ken tadashi
Kokoro tadashi karazariba
Sono ken mata tadashi karazu
Ken o monoban tu suru monowa subekaraku
Sono kokoro o manabe


The sword (fist) and the mind are one.
When the mind is right, the sword (fist) is right.
When the mind is not right, the sword (fist) is also not right.
To study the art of kendo, one must first study his mind.

Sensei Noah said...

Sempai Mike,

Great question!

The Japanese "no" is how the possessive is denoted; it's the equivalent of " 's " in English. [for example, "Kanojo-no namae wa Sue desu" - "Her name is Sue". . .in this instance, the "no" changes the meaning of kanojo from "she" to "her"] Generally, the possessive is used when a kata is named after a person, a family, a place, religion, or ideology. For example: Tensho-no Kata (The kata of Tensho - or "Tensho's Kata"), Shiu Shi-no Kon (The staff of Shiu Shi - or "Shiu Shi's staff")

Verbal naming of kata can be varied: you may say "Kata Tensho," "Tensho-no Kata," or the Anglicized "Tensho Kata." You may hear the Pinan kata, as a whole, referred to as "Pinan-no Kata;" however, the possessive "no" is generally not used when naming specific kata in the series (e.g. "Pinan Shodan").

Note as well the Anglicization of titles, such as Sensei, Sempai, Renshi, Kyoshi, etc. English-speaking budoka have grown accustomed to the Anglicized "Sensei Bob" or "Sempai Betty;" the correct (Japanese) nomenclature is "Smith-sensei," "Jones-sempai," etc.

To sum up, it is not incorrect to omit the "no" when naming a kata; "Kata Tensho," "Tensho-no Kata," and "Tensho Kata" are all acceptable names for this kata. It all depends on how formal you want to be.

Mike said...

Hey Sensei Noah, How do you say spinning back fist in Japanese? Thanks, Sempai Mike

Sensei Noah said...

Sempai Mike,

Spinning backfist is "ushiro uraken" (literally "backfist to the rear" - as you must have your back to your opponent to perform this strike).

The Japanese word for "spinning" is jiten; however, it is not used to describe this particular motion.

cjpace said...

Domo arigato Sensei! ...for putting up the Kendo meditation on the website - I just printed out a few copies for my office.
Thanks, Sempai Chris

Sensei Noah said...

The kendo meditation is now up on MountainStreamBudo.com under "Terminology."

Lori said...

Hi Sensei Noah!
So, we now have a shodan-ho in our dojo. I was just wondering if there is a title we would use to address him.

Sensei Noah said...

Thanks, Lori!
The rank of Shodan-ho is not accompanied by a title. Shodan-ho, or "probationary black belt," is used as a youth rank in our dojo, and is approximately the equivalent of an adult sankyu. The title of "Sempai," which is given to those holding the [adult] ranks of Shodan or Nidan, is not used in this case.
Great question!

Elena said...

Hi Sensei Noah, Thanks to you and the other Senseis for an amazing Shiai. I am so proud to train at MSB - our spirit and sense of unity and camaraderie is really strong, and I think that shone through at Shiai. The competition was fair and intense and really, really exciting. Kata competition was awesome. Thanks again!!! -Ellen

Sensei Noah said...

Ellen-san,
Thanks for your sweet & thougtful words! Your post really means a lot to me, but the true thanks go to you guys; without students such as you, we wouldn't have had such a successful shiai, let alone such a great dojo. Sensei Carol & I are truly lucky to have so many great students who want to train with us! So thanks again, and congratulations on earning your yonkyu in karate and for training so diligently over the past few years! Domo arigato gozai masu!

Elena said...

Hi Sensei, Congratulations on another great Shiai! Its so energizing and motivating to participate in these events. Yea MSB!!!

Elena said...

Sensei: I'm trying to conceptualize Basai-Dai - as the kata practitioner, am I defending the fortress or am I attacking the fortress?

Sensei Noah said...

Ellen-san,

Thanks for the compliment! Honestly, we wouldn't be able to have shiai at all without students such as you, so all of the congratulations should be directed at you guys!!

_______

As to your Bassai dai question, the kanji for "Bassai" (Passai) have alternately been translated as "to penetrate a fortress" and "to remove from a fortress." I think your question is a bit esoteric; I don't think the kata was named after a literal fortress (the history of this kata is obscure, and many theories abound). I personally feel that the name of the kata has more to do with the complexity of the embusen and possible bunkai applications; I've never thought of it as a literal penetration of [or extraction from] an actual fortress! However, if your literal interpretation of the kata name leads you to a fuller or better understanding of the kata itself, then by all means go with it, and make the kata yours!

RevKev said...

As a student of Sensei Louis Stanishia during the Triangle School days, I am confused as to the reference to his system and style.

Sensei was a teacher of the Shorin-Ryu Okinawan style, which was a balanced system of body and weapons.

I haven't seen the proper name "Shorin-Ryu" mentioned on the site.

Sensei Noah said...

Hi, RevKev,

A great question! Thanks for posting.

Yes, you are correct in that we were taught as students that the system we were learning was Shorin-ryu. This was, in fact, incorrect.

15 of the 21 kata in our system are Shotokan kata; 4 of them are Goju-ryu, and 2 of them have obscure origins.

I have trained with several instructors of Kobayashi Shorin-ryu since we left Sensei Stanishia, and our system bears very little resemblance to either this or any other strain of Shorin-ryu, other than that fact that Shotokan is an offshoot, in part, of Shorin-ryu.

Having researched the origins of our kata and our system as thoroughly as possible, I've come to the conclusion that we are a hybrid of Shotokan (80%) and Goju-ryu (20%), although our movements appear Chinese in nature and not Okinawan, and thus, out of context of kata, resemble neither Shotokan nor Goju-ryu.

As to your reference to "body and weapons," karate by nature does not deal with weapons at all. Many karate styles have incorporated elements of kobudo into their systems; however, karate by its definition does not incorporate weapons at all. At Mountain Stream Budo we offer a kobudo program as a fully-formed and separate art.

As to why Sensei Stanishia taught us that our style was "Shorin-ryu," I spoke to a student who was training under Sensei in the very late 60s up until 1971. This person told me that during that time, Sensei was looking for a patch that referenced Okinawan karate. This was long before the days of Century Martial Arts supply shops were around, and apparently the only Okinawan karate patch he was able to find was one that said Shorin-ryu, which I guess was close enough for him at the time.

Whether this story holds any truth, I can't say, and why he called his style Shorin-ryu and not Shotokan (if simplification was necessary) remains a mystery. What I can tell you is that our style contains none of the distictly Shorin-ryu kata (such as Fukyugata, Kusanku, Ananku, etc.). We only practice those Shorin-ryu kata which also appear in Shotokan (the Tekki [Naihanchi]and Pinan [Heian] series, and Bassai Dai, which is actually Bassai Sho in Shorin-ryu). However, these kata appear in many Okinawan karate styles and are not unique to Shorin-ryu. There are also many Shotokan kata that do not appear at all in our style.

So, in summary, although our system contains kata from Shotokan (and thus Shorin-ryu) and Goju-ryu, we are a hybrid style, and do not fit into any of these styles specifically, either in curriculum or in appearance.

All karate styles are hybrids of earlier styles, and every karate style is Okinawan in ancestry (and even so, all Okinawan karate has Chinese roots).

Many people find it important to classify martial arts and to pigeonhole a system as being one style or another. I don't agree with this, especially since we don't belong to a large organization. To me, all martial arts are cousins, and all go back to the same point of origin.

If someone were to casually ask what style of karate we represent, I might say "Shotokan," for simplicity's sake, since this is the style we most closely resemble, but in truth we're a mixed breed that is certainly neither Shorin-ryu nor any other traditionally established style.

norbs4 said...

what an interesting question and an even more interesting answer

Adam said...

Sensei,
You mentioned before that there are 15 kata of Shotokan origin and 4 from Goju-ryu. Which four are from Goju-ryu?

Sensei Noah said...

Our four Goju kata are Tensho, Saifa, Saiunchin, and Sanchin.

Lori said...

Sensei....I was just practicing kata...and I'll be darned if I couldn't get through Pinan Godan!!!!! ARG!!!! I kept messing up at the bottom after the kansetsu waza...tetsui...oi tsuki...then is it morote uke?? I kept wanting to turn the other way and do a shuto...Ahhhh!!!! So frustrating! Help!!!!

Sensei Noah said...

Lori-san,
After the oi tsuki in Pinan Godan, you turn 180-degrees counter-clockwise (moving the left foot so that it is in line with the right, into kokutsu dachi) and perform a left uchi uke.
Pinan Godan & Bassai Sho have more than a few similarities, and it's very common for brown belt students to become confused here, so don't be frustrated!!!

crcardillo said...

Hey Sensei Noah.

I need a little clarification on Tai-Sabaki (kicks and tetsui)...

Movements 1 & 2 - we're going to step back and kick with the rear leg, correct? So, on movement 1 I'm going to step back with my right and kick with my right...movement 2 I'll step back with my left and kick with my left. Is that correct?

On movements 7 & 8 we step back as usual but kick with the front leg (from a cat stance)?

The hand that's not being used to block should be up protecting the face...not chambered, correct?

When we do Tai-Sabaki (tetsui) the hand that's not being used to block should be where...chambered or up protecting the face?

Thanks so much.
Chris

Sensei Noah said...

In the tai sabaki kicks set, on #1, you take a suri-ashi step back 45 degrees with your LEFT, leaving the right foot forward, and kick with the RIGHT foot. On #2, you shuffle back with the RIGHT foot, leaving the LEFT forward, and kick with the LEFT. Both kicks are thrown with the FORWARD leg.

#7 and #8 are the same as #1 and #2, although #7 = #2 and #8 = #1.

Correct, the non-blocking hand is in kamae position, not chamber.

The uraken set has been replaced with the tetsui set for 3rd kyu. On that set as well, the non-blocking hand is in kamae (guard) position, and not chambered.

Thanks!!

Lake Lincolndale Martial Arts said...

Sensei could you please detail your bowing procedure as it pertains to the Shomen. Domo

Sensei Noah said...

Typically, one would bow to the Shomen (or Shinzen, or Joseki) first, then to Sensei in the beginning of class.

Bowing at the end of class is reversed: Sensei first, then Shomen.

The Shomen is generally bowed to first and last.

Also, you hold your bow to the Shomen significantly longer than your bow to the Sensei. The bow to Shomen should be held for a good slow 5-count.

Also, respect to the Sempai should be given after the bow to Sensei, not before.

Lake Lincolndale Martial Arts said...

SENSEI, IS THERE CERTAIN PROTOCOL PERTAINING TO WHICH WALL YOUR SHOMEN WILL BE? ( NORHT SOUTH EAST......ETC) OR IS IT A MATTER OF PERSONNAL OPINION. DOMO SEMPAI RICHARD

Sensei Noah said...

Sempai Rich,
Good question! Typically the Shomen/Shinzen/Joseki is located on the wall that is FARTHEST from the dojo's entrance. The Shomen is also typically the narrowest wall, not the long wall which is generally covered with mirrors.
The location of the Shomen doesn't have anything to do with direction (north/south etc.).
However, you have to make do with what you have; these are guidelines, not rock-solid laws, and the position of the Shomen is usually dictated by the layout of a given dojo.

Lake Lincolndale Martial Arts said...

Noah Sensei (I'll try and spell this one correctly) lol Can you tell me what the dan belts look like for our karate system above go-dan? (red white, white red, black with red stripe etc...)? domo........norbs

Sensei Noah said...

Sempai,

You're asking about the belts worn by people who hold classical Shogo grades.

The first grade, Renshi, is represented by a belt that is (in our system) half white and half red, with a solid black backing. The grade of Renshi is held by instructors who hold the rank of 4th through 6th dan. 4th dans wear the belt with the white side up, and 5th and 6th dans wear the belt red side up.

The second grade, Kyoshi, is represented by a belt that is solid black with a red stripe running horizontally through its center. The grade of Kyoshi is held by 7th and 8th dans, and the belt is worn the same way by both ranks.

The last grade is Hanshi, which is the title given to 9th and 10th dans. Hanshi 9th dans wear a solid red belt that has a horizontal black stripe running through the center, and a Hanshi 10th dan would wear a solid red belt.

These Shogo belts vary depending on what Okinawan karate style you study. In many systems, Hanshi grade instructors wear a solid red belt (both 9th & 10th dan), and Kyoshi grade instructors wear a red and white checkerboard belt. The Renshi belt is typically half white and half red, but in some styles, Renshi Godan is white side up and Renshi Rokudan is red side up.
In some Okinawan systems, the Shogo grade of Renshi only applies to 5th and 6th dans, and 4th dan students wear a solid black belt with four white stripes.

I hope this helps! If you want to see photos of these belts, please e-mail me directly.

Vicki said...

Sensei Noah what day does Youth Karate finish testing?

Sensei Noah said...

Hi Vicki!

The last day for youth karate rank testing will be Saturday July 24th, which is also the day before shiai.

besrooster said...

Hey Sensei Noah, in Naihanchi Sandan where are the 3 Mikazuki geris directed? Jodan or Chudan?
Thanks, Sempai Mike

Sensei Noah said...

Sempai Mike,

Jodan.

Of interest, however, is that you don't often see those mikazuki geris in Naihanchi Sandan in other styles that have the kata. Shorin-ryu, for example, practices a variation of the kata without any kicks.

Good question!

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah -

What does "Sunakake" and "Osai uke" mean? I don't have my curriculum with me so I'm sure my spelling is wrong.

Thanks.

Chris Cardillo

Sensei Noah said...

Sempai Chris,

Your spelling is actually perfect!

Osai uke means "pressing block."

Sunakake is typically translated as "sand throw," although it would probably be a little more accurate to say "sand spraying" (suna = sand and kakeru is "to spray"). "Sand throw" is fine for class/testing purposes.

Lake Lincolndale Martial Arts said...

NOAH SENSEI, IS THERE A PROPER PHRASE FOR BOWING TO ENTER THE RING OF AN IPPON KUMITE MATCH OR JU KUMITE ( SUCH AS SHOMEN NI, SENSEI NI, OTAGAI NI ETC) JUST WONDERING .AS ALWAYS DOMO, NORBS

Sensei Noah said...

Sensei,

Great question. There is no command to enter during ippon kumite. Following the command, "Shinpan-ni. . . rei" (face the judge. . .bow), there are no further commands; the competitors complete the remaining bows without instruction.

For jiyu kumite (free sparring), the command to enter the ring can be either "Shiaijo-ni. . . rei" (face the match area. . .bow), or simply "nyujo" (enter). Once the competitors enter the ring, the command, "sensei-ni. . .rei" or "shinpan-ni. . .rei" (face the teacher/judge. . .bow) is given, followed by "otagai-ni. . .rei" (face each other/face your partner. . .bow). These commands are given in reverse order at the end of the match.

Justin said...

What is the practical definition of "kamiza"? In which direction should the kamiza face?

Sensei Noah said...

"Kamiza" can be defined as "high seat," "upper seat," or "spirit (god) seat," depending on the context (Shinto/Buddhist religion vs. martial arts dojo). It is typically the place in a room furthest from the entrance (thus warmest and most desirable).

In a dojo, the kamiza is typically the place where photos of a style's ranking teachers or lineage hang, and where the kamidana (god shelf) resides. "Kamidana" is typically associated with religion (Shinto or Buddhist), and this word is seldom used in a secular dojo.

You will hear different dojos use "shomen" (front), "shinzen" (heart/tradition/spiritual center), or "kamiza" (top seat) to refer to the front or main wall of the room. One is no more correct than the others.

As to the second part of your question, there is no "correct" direction (west, south, etc.) for kamiza to face. You're basically at the mercy of the layout of your dojo here. The kamiza/shomen is normally the wall farthest from the main entrance, but can be anywhere based on the layout of the room (width vs. length).

Hope all that makes sense!

Vicki said...

hi sensei its Vicki, I'm going to resume my karate lessons, I heard my friend Zulie joined (: so yeah, ummm, when's a good time for me to start again?

Sensei Noah said...

Hi, Vicki!!
That's great news! We'd love to have you back! Yes, Zulie is our newest student and seems to be enjoying karate enormously. She's a fast learner!
You can come back any time! The adult class schedule is the same as always. Please drop me an e-mail at SenseiNoah@MountainStreamBudo if you have any concerns. Otherwise, I'm looking forward to seeing you back in class soon!

WhoamI said...

Sensei,
I am having trouble remembering the counter attacks for the first bo bo kumi.
Working down, can you list them so I can study them?

Sensei Noah said...

Marc-san,

Thanks for your question!
Hojo undo dai ichi bo-bo kumi counter-attacks are as follows:

#1 (jodan uchi attack) - parry left, jodan tsuki

#2 (jodan naname uchi attack) - gyaku chudan yoko uchi

#3 (chudan uchi attack) - gyaku gedan naname uchi

#4 (gedan naname uchi attack) - jodan naname uchi

#5 (jodan tsuki attack) - jodan tsuki

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah -

I have a quick question for you...

Knife Attacks - stomach thrust - hot side kansetsu waza - what is the entry?

Thanks!

Chris

Sensei Noah said...

The entrance for hot side kansetsu from a stomach thrust attack is juji uke; use your right hand to pin, and the subsequent atemi is a spinning left empi to the jaw.

nmatalon said...

Sensei,

Can you please tell me what is the order/type of defenses for Tai Sabaki both kicking and throwing sets?

Thanks
-n

Sensei Noah said...

Noah,
Thanks for posting!

Defenses for the tai sabaki kicks set is as follows:

1) right front kick
2) left front kick
3) left roundhouse kick
4) right roundhouse kick
5) right side kick
6) left side kick
7) left front kick
8) right front kick
9) right side kick (to the knee)
10) left side kick (to the ribs)

Tai sabaki throws set:

1) koshi guruma (left side)
2) ippon seoinage
3) osoto gari
4) kosoto gari
5) compound kote gaeshi (with tai otoshi)
6) compound kote gaeshi (with tai otoshi)
7) harai goshi
8) koshi guruma
9) judo tai otoshi
10) basic (knee-drop seoinage)

Hope that helps!!

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah -

In regard to Knife Attacks - Wall Tech.
Stomach thrust - haito, the disarm is the "pass through" after the compound kote gaeshi correct? Thanks...

Chris

Sensei Noah said...

On knife-against-wall, stomach thrust, haito defense, the "pass-through" is used to help roll the uke over onto his or her stomach without cutting yourself with the knife. The actual disarm occurs AFTER the uke is prone: put your knee on his or her back as a means of control, and take the knife out through the gate of the thumb as you typically would during any other knife disarming.

Thanks!

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah -
Would you explain step #3 (Cross lapel pull-around) in the Goshin-jitsu kata?

Thank you so much.

Chris C.

Noah-sensei said...

Sure!

The cross lapel pull-around in the kata is initially performed just as it is in the combat curriculum; the only significant difference is the ending: after the uke takes his free-fall, the tori lifts the uke's right arm up, locking the elbow joint, and extending his own right leg (in a zenkutsu dachi-like position), uses his knee to hyper-extend the uke's elbow, while simultaneously performing wrist punishment with the thumbs in kote gaeshi position. Also, this being Goshin-jitsu kata, there is no kiai on the initial atemi.

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah - I have a quick question regarding "Pendulum" when the gun is being drawn from behind...is the right arm on the neck the atemi?

Noah-sensei said...

Sensei,

There are 2 atemi during the rear gun pendulum: mawashi hiza geri to the groin, and an implied ude uchi to the neck, which sets your right arm up for the takedown.

Thanks for asking!

crcardillo said...

Hey Sensei Noah -

I was looking at 4 Man Attack - the last technique says "Skirmish (kokyu nage)". What is kokyu nage?

Thanks.

Chris

Noah-sensei said...

Kokyunage is another way to say aikinage - same throw. The skirmish version during the 4-man attack is the "upper chest grab" variation, as done elswhere in the curriculum off of a rear body grab.

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah - is the an atemi before EVERY technique in Come Alongs?

Thanks.

Chris

Noah-sensei said...

There are no atemi whatsoever in the come-alongs sequence. . .you may be thinking of the joint locks sequence, in which case, yes, there is a strike before every joint lock in the set.

crcardillo said...

Sensei Noah -

Would you clarify something for me...
Knife Attacks - Backhand to the Face - the technique is kote gaeshi with pull-around, but is this the technique we pull the knife hand towards the ground and apply a cuticle grip on the throw?

Thanks!
Chris

Noah-sensei said...

Happy to clarify. . .
Actually, you're confusing two techniques. The hand smash/cuticle lock/kote gaeshi is applied during "basic" off of a carotid stab knife attack.
From a backhand face slash, you hook the wrist and use the attacker's momentum to pull him around, then immediately reverse direction into a kote gaeshi. No hand smash or cuticle lock. Make sense?

mark said...

sensei,

in the sai bo kumis, long and short versions. what side kamai does the sai kobudoka start in?

Noah-sensei said...

In the sai/bo kumi, the tori (sai-guy) starts in a hidari chudan kamae, and then switches to migi chudan kamae (simultaneously with the uke), before stepping back and blocking jodan uke on the left.

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Hi Sensei Noah,
Where I can find the names of the blocks in the Hojo undo dai ich singles/series ?

Also what are the names of the stances in the Yellow-belt curriculum?

Thanks in advance!
Meredith

Noah-sensei said...

Hi Merry!

The blocks in hojoundo dai ichi kumi are:

1. Jodan uke
2. Jodan naname uke
3. Chudan yoko uke
4. Gedan harai uke
5. Chudan kakie uke

As for stances, there is no "stances" category in kobudo as there is with karate; however, as an orange belt you'll be working on zenkutsu dachi, han-zenkutsu dachi, shiko dachi, neko ashi dachi, and musubi dachi primarily.

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Hi Sensei Noah
I would like to know if you have any book recommendations for the junior black belt requirement? My mom asked if the citation should be MLA or APA (No, I don't understand).
Than you
Abby Lowder

abby@equusferus.com
(I used my mom's Google account)

Noah-sensei said...

Hi, Abby-san!
We have a mini-library in the dojo that contains a number of appropriate books for your Shodan-ho requirement. Next time you're in class, take a look!
Nope, I have no idea what your mom is talking about either.
:-)

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Hi Sensei
Quick question- in the Hojoundo dai ni SERIES- the uke initiates an attack (of sorts)
So
1. Uke- Gedan naname uke
Tori- counters with Gedan harai uke/Jodan naname uchi

2. Uke- Gedan naname uke
Tori coutners with Gedan hane uke/Gedan nukibo

3. In the Sunakake- does the Tori performs the movement first?

4. Uke- performs punch (tsuki)-
Tori counters with Chudon osai uke

5. Here's the main question-
For Jodan gyaku uchi/Jodan gyaku tsuki- the Tori attackes first? And the Uke counters?

Is this similar to the #5 individuals?

Noah-sensei said...

Merry,

Regarding bo hojoundo dai ni series kumi:

#1 & #2 - the uke's attack is gedan naname uchi - surely just a type-o on your part, but worth mentioning just in case. . .

#3 - yes, the tori advances and performs sunakake. As a reaction to this, the uke retreats, stepping back out of the way of the sand throw and switching grips, taking up a right chudan kamae.

#5 - yes, the tori is performing the hojoundo (jodan gyaku uchi/gyaku tsuki), and the uke is defending. The uke's movements are the same as the final rep in the individuals kumi: the uke jumps around in place (not stepping back, as in the first 4 reps of the individuals) and parries the gyaku tsuki. The counter attack is a jodan gyaku tsuki.

Hope this helps!

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Thanks so much for the reply Noah-Sensei. Yes, I forgot to proofread the uke/uchi as I wrote this in between seeing patients. I definitely was a tad confused since this Bo Hojoundo Dai Ni has a different order and cadence than the Bo Hojoundio Dai Ich. But I am glad I asked since Ben and I are practicing a lot at home- we wanted to get it right!
Thanks again!
Merry

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Hi Sensei Noah,
One more favour please. For the Bo hojoundo dai ni individuals, could you remind me what the Tori performs at the end of each movement and what is the counter movement the Uke performs to 'win'. I believe I asked the same question for the dai ich.
Thanks again for your answers, they are much appreciated.
Merry

Noah-sensei said...

Merry,

You're welcome!

Regarding bo hojoundo dai ni individuals:

1. tori performs 5 reps of gedan harai uke/jodan naname uchi. Uke's counter-attack after rep #5 is the same as that for jodan uchi in hojoundo dai ichi: a parry and tsuki.

2. tori performs 5 reps of gedan hane uke/gedan nukibo. Uke's final counter-attack on rep #5 is to jump, evading the nukibo, and gyaku jodan naname uchi (same as in series).

3. tori performs 5 reps of sunakake, and then finishes with a nodo tsuki. Uke's final counter-attack on rep #5 is kakie uke/tsuki.

4. tori performs 5 reps of chudan osai uke. Uke's final counter-attack on rep #5 is jodan gyaku naname uchi.

5. tori performs 5 reps of jodan gyaku uchi/jodan gyaku tsuki. Uke's final counter-attack on rep #5 is to jump and parry the incoming gyaku tsuki, and then gyaku tsuki.

I hope that answers your questions!!!

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Hi Sensei Noah
I hope your hand in feeling better. A couple of clarification questions if you don't mind.

1. Is there a name for the high step (right over left) performed after the series of six? And following that step, is there a special name for the strike to the claivicle or is considered a jodan uchi?

2. Is a name for the dep sweeping block performed right after the high jodan uke? (The block performed just before the gorendo).

3. Using a compass to designate the turns in the Shushi-no Kon, it is true that we never face south? I noticed while mapping the moves using a compass to orient myself- we don't ever face south or 180 degrees from our starting position.

Are there any new stances- or any stances aside from zenkutsu dachi, han zenkutsu dachi and neko dachi?

Thanks so much and keep healing,
Merry

Noah-sensei said...

Merry,

Thanks!

1. No, there is no specific name for the stepping motion you're describing in Shushi-no Kon; the clavicle strike does also not have a name, although it falls somewhere between jodan uchi and jodan naname uchi - this strike is unique to this kata.

2. The sweeping strike does not have a name in kobudo. I might unofficially describe it as an ashi barai (leg sweep), but that is not an "official" name.

3. Correct - there are 3 attackers in Shushi-no Kon: hidari-no teki (enemy to the left), migi-no teki (enemy to the right), and mae-no teki (enemy to the front). There is no ushiro-no teki (enemy to the rear) in this kata.

4. In this kata, you'll see fudo dachi, sochin dachi, sagi ashi dachi, and shinobi dachi, although none of these are official kobudo stances. . . remember: there are no stances in OKDR!

Mer-on-Hudson said...

Good morning Sensei,
Could you list all the movements in Hojo Undo Dai San? I have the terminology questions and Sai Hojo Undo but cannot seem to locate the Hojo Undo Dai San. You went over them in class but I am better as retention if I see them printed.
Thanks
Merry

crcardillo said...

Sensei - the "Vital Areas" question (#4) says to name and demonstrate a striking technique to each area. The list below contains the strikes that would work for the areas - would you clarify that these are the strikes you're looking for? Thank you.

FRONT
1. Top of the head – hammer fist
2. Eyes – eye poke
3. Temples – hammer fist
4. Bridge of the nose – palm heel or ridge hand
5. Upper lip – ridge hand
6. Jaw – palm
7. Adam’s apple – half fist
8. Heart – palm or punch
9. Solar plexus – side fist or middle knuckle
10. Lower Abdomen – punch, front kick
11. Groin – groin kick or knee
12. Knee – side kick
13. Instep – stomp

BACK

1. Base of the skull – ridge hand
2. Between the shoulder blades – hammer fist or palm
3. Floating ribs – uppercut or elbow
4. 4th Lumbar vertebra – knee
5. Kidneys – hook punch
6. Coccyx – knee

crcardillo said...

Sorry Sensei - one more curriculum question...#6 Atemi Waza:

6 parts of the leg used in atemi and 8 parts of the hand - I need the english translation. I know some but not all of them. Thank you!34246828

Chris

Noah-sensei said...

Meredith - Bo hojoundo dai san techniques are:

1. Gedan yoko uke/jodan naname uchi
2. Jodan naname uchi/jodan nukibo
3. Chudan nagashi uchi/gedan yoko uke/jodan naname uchi
4. Gyaku gedan yoko uke/gedan osai uke/jodan naname uchi
5. Gorenda (jodan naname uchi/ago uchi/jodan uchi/gyaku chudan yoko uchi/jodan naname uchi)

Please remind me when you're in class next & I'll print a paper copy out for you!

Noah-sensei said...

Chris,
There are no specific techniques required for this question (vital areas); however, certain techniques fit certain target areas better than others. For example, I would avoid haito uchi for #4 and #5 (taisho works best for #4 and seiryuto for #5). #10 and #11 should be hand techniques and not kicks.

For the rear vitals, here's what I'd suggest:

1. Base of the skull – taisho
2. Between the shoulder blades – tate tsuki
3. Floating ribs – shuto uchi
4. 4th Lumbar vertebra – tate tsuki
5. Kidneys – nihon taisho
6. Coccyx – choku tsuki

Again - none of these are set in stone, but some work much better than others!

Noah-sensei said...

Chris again - English translations for parts of the leg and hand:

LEG:
1. knee - hiza
2. shin - sune
3. ball of the foot - josokute
4. heel - komi
5. instep - sokko
6. blade - sokuto

ARM:
1. elbow - empi
2. forearm - ude
3. palm heel - taisho
4. ridge hand - haito
5. knife edge - shuto
6. ox jaw - sieryuto
7. back fist - uraken
8. straight punch - choku tsuki
9. hammer fist - tetsui

zulie said...

Hi sensei,
Can you please give the techniques in Tai Sabaki Escape, Tetsui, Kicks and Throws?
Thank you

Noah-sensei said...

Zulie!
Tai sabaki escapes is the blocking set that we do as part of our warmup every day. Just the block, no counter-attack. I'm SURE you know these by now!

Tetsui set:
1. right tetsui to temple
2. left tetui to temple
3. right tetsui bridge of nose
4. left tetsui bridge of nose
5. right tetsui bridge of nose
6. left tetsui bridge of nose
7. left tetsui temple
8. right tetsui temple
9. right tetsui temple
10. left tetsui temple

Kicks set:
1. right mae geri
2. left mae geri
3. left mawashi geri
4. right mawashi geri
5. left yoko geri
6. right yoko geri
7. left mae (or uchi mikazuki) geri
8. right mae (or uchi mikazuki) geri
9. right yoko geri to knee
10. left yoko geri to ribs

Throws set:
1. koshi guruma (left side)
2. ippon seoinage
3. osoto gari
4. kosoto gari
5. compound kote gaeshi/tai otoshi
6. compound kote gaeshi/tai otoshi
7. harai goshi
8. koshi guruma (right side)
9. judo tai otoshi
10. basic

crcardillo said...

Sensei - would you remind me of the motions for counts 9 & 10 in Tai Sabaki Uraken.

Also, counts 7 & 8 in Tai Sabaki Kote Gaeshi end in Kote Gaeshi #3 correct?

Thanks so much!
Chris

Noah-sensei said...

Tai sabaki uraken set #9 and #10: on both of these, absorb the push and protect yourself by raising both hands (either shuto-style or urate-style), then counter-attack with an uraken to the bridge of the nose, striking with the hand that is closest to the attacker's face.

Tai sabaki kote gaeshi #7 and #8:
No, these do no end in kote gaeshi #3. #7 is the same as #2, and #8 is the same as #1, so both of these end in a compound kote gaeshi throw.

Hope that helps!